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I need some help...more mental than anything else


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#1 downrange72

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 06:14 PM

Background...(Low B production, Upper C L-10, Mid C Limited. Low C Singlestack).

Experience 4 total 3 years "full time".

College educated with a Master's Degree.

First and foremost...Before almost EVERY Stage...

1. I close my eyes and can visualize the stage.

2. I can tell you my plan verbatim.

3. I can tell you where I need to reload.

4. I see the sights lift on most every shot (I realize that sometimes I maybe looking over the rear, but for the most part, I SEE the red fiber optic most every time.

Then the buzzer goes off. It all goes to...well you know what.

I have speed issues that I know is from lack of practice. I lose some time with reloading and movement (I do have an ankle injury that requires surgery, but I don't feel the pain when I shoot, so I won't blame that.) I normally will finish mid pack overall of local matches and some majors (Totally sucked at MI, but that is another story). Recently, with the help of Coach, diagnosed a grip issue that I feel is corrected for the most part (it still raises its ugly head from time to time. I also seem to regress at the end of every year (burnout?).

Here is what happened today...1st stage at South Central Gun Club in Freetown, IN. I shot a 30-32 round stage in 20 seconds(ish) shooting Limited. I felt fantastic after I finished. I don't remember anything...let go and took off. Three misses. I also had 11 alphas and 13 charlies. I swear I saw the sight every time and felt great everything was Mid torso A or C. It was a shoot on the move stage, so I'm sure I was bouncing...no big deal. Okay, slow down a bit and make sure.

Second Stage, I shot a 28 round stage in 27ish seconds...Clean, 1 Delta. I'm sure splits were horrible, because I made sure of every shot. I think I had 5-6 Charlie.

Then the third stage, Riverdale Standards...Train wreck. I will blame this on me, I felt comfortable with it, maybe too overconfident. I've shot it several times. First String 4 shots reload to weak hand (supposed to be freestyle). Second String, Two shots on first target, reload strong hand (I did remember to skip the first target to avoid the extra shot, extra hit penalty). Third String WHO, two misses (no worries, that is not uncommon, yet frustrating nonetheless). I'll blame poor grip. Mostly Alphas and some charlies with the two misses. I don't believe there were any deltas

Fourth Stage, not horrible, not fantastic. It was probably a middle of the pack run, solid for me. All Alphas with a few charlies and maybe a delta. I felt fairly good overall.

Fifth Stage, Again, about the same as above. A decent run for me. Again mostly alphas, a few charlies, maybe a Delta or two.

Sixth and Final Stage. I felt great again. This COF was 28 rounds. I finished in high 19 seconds with an extra reload (I've been shooting L-10 99% of the time this year and instinctively reloaded into the final position). Absolutely felt like I did the best I could have. One issue...well 3. Mostly Alphas and Charlies with 3 total mikes with an FTE. I accounted for the target every single time during walk through. Close my eyes before I shot...the whole "shebang". If I were golfing, I would have thrown the club over the berm and walked away.

Four of the last 5 matches have been absolutely horrible. I feel good before I shoot...focus on the first target before the buzzer, clear my head..all that jazz. It just doesn't seem to work for me. It seems the more I "burn in" the stage or feel really well on how I shot the stage, it seems to come crashing down when the buzzer goes off or when the scores are called. The "smoother" I feel, the more the results prove otherwise. If I shoot like I don't care, it is disastrous as well. If I "think" through a stage, that is when my results seem to be more acceptable, at least with accuracy.
,
Am I nuts? I don't trust my subconscious. It has let me down way too many times the last 3 years (I don't really count the first year...I didn't shoot that much). I argue with Jake and Coach over this issue frequently. Believe me, I understand the concept. However, most every time the "zen" moment occurs, it is disastrous on the score sheet. I know those are some harsh negative words listed above, but there is no nice way to put it. Video posted below. It isn't pretty and it is PG-13 for the language.



Also video from last week where the accuracy was much more acceptable but the speed was not.


Does this gun make my butt look fat?

#2 toothguy

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 10:03 AM

Background...(Low B production, Upper C L-10, Mid C Limited. Low C Singlestack).

Experience 4 total 3 years "full time".

College educated with a Master's Degree.

First and foremost...Before almost EVERY Stage...

1. I close my eyes and can visualize the stage.

2. I can tell you my plan verbatim.

3. I can tell you where I need to reload.

4. I see the sights lift on most every shot (I realize that sometimes I maybe looking over the rear, but for the most part, I SEE the red fiber optic most every time.

Then the buzzer goes off. It all goes to...well you know what.

I have speed issues that I know is from lack of practice. I lose some time with reloading and movement (I do have an ankle injury that requires surgery, but I don't feel the pain when I shoot, so I won't blame that.) I normally will finish mid pack overall of local matches and some majors (Totally sucked at MI, but that is another story). Recently, with the help of Coach, diagnosed a grip issue that I feel is corrected for the most part (it still raises its ugly head from time to time. I also seem to regress at the end of every year (burnout?).

Here is what happened today...1st stage at South Central Gun Club in Freetown, IN. I shot a 30-32 round stage in 20 seconds(ish) shooting Limited. I felt fantastic after I finished. I don't remember anything...let go and took off. Three misses. I also had 11 alphas and 13 charlies. I swear I saw the sight every time and felt great everything was Mid torso A or C. It was a shoot on the move stage, so I'm sure I was bouncing...no big deal. Okay, slow down a bit and make sure.

Second Stage, I shot a 28 round stage in 27ish seconds...Clean, 1 Delta. I'm sure splits were horrible, because I made sure of every shot. I think I had 5-6 Charlie.

Then the third stage, Riverdale Standards...Train wreck. I will blame this on me, I felt comfortable with it, maybe too overconfident. I've shot it several times. First String 4 shots reload to weak hand (supposed to be freestyle). Second String, Two shots on first target, reload strong hand (I did remember to skip the first target to avoid the extra shot, extra hit penalty). Third String WHO, two misses (no worries, that is not uncommon, yet frustrating nonetheless). I'll blame poor grip. Mostly Alphas and some charlies with the two misses. I don't believe there were any deltas

Fourth Stage, not horrible, not fantastic. It was probably a middle of the pack run, solid for me. All Alphas with a few charlies and maybe a delta. I felt fairly good overall.

Fifth Stage, Again, about the same as above. A decent run for me. Again mostly alphas, a few charlies, maybe a Delta or two.

Sixth and Final Stage. I felt great again. This COF was 28 rounds. I finished in high 19 seconds with an extra reload (I've been shooting L-10 99% of the time this year and instinctively reloaded into the final position). Absolutely felt like I did the best I could have. One issue...well 3. Mostly Alphas and Charlies with 3 total mikes with an FTE. I accounted for the target every single time during walk through. Close my eyes before I shot...the whole "shebang". If I were golfing, I would have thrown the club over the berm and walked away.

Four of the last 5 matches have been absolutely horrible. I feel good before I shoot...focus on the first target before the buzzer, clear my head..all that jazz. It just doesn't seem to work for me. It seems the more I "burn in" the stage or feel really well on how I shot the stage, it seems to come crashing down when the buzzer goes off or when the scores are called. The "smoother" I feel, the more the results prove otherwise. If I shoot like I don't care, it is disastrous as well. If I "think" through a stage, that is when my results seem to be more acceptable, at least with accuracy.
,
Am I nuts? I don't trust my subconscious. It has let me down way too many times the last 3 years (I don't really count the first year...I didn't shoot that much). I argue with Jake and Coach over this issue frequently. Believe me, I understand the concept. However, most every time the "zen" moment occurs, it is disastrous on the score sheet. I know those are some harsh negative words listed above, but there is no nice way to put it. Video posted below. It isn't pretty and it is PG-13 for the language.



Also video from last week where the accuracy was much more acceptable but the speed was not.




Just trying to help if I may. A couple of things you wrote stand out to me. "I have speed issues that I know are from lack of practice" and "I don't trust my subconscious, it has let me down way to many times". When you practice whatever, you build pathways in the brain that in times of stress will become default settings. If you are not practicing you have no default settings and are creating ones as you go, like trying to cash a check on an empty account. If I may suggest, buy Steve Anderson's book and build your mental bank account buy putting in the hours. Then you can go into observer mode from a strong subconscious and you will trust it because you made the deposits.

Edited by toothguy, 01 October 2012 - 10:14 AM.

The drive to want to win is only an asset when it pushes you to practice better/more and develop your mental game. When you let it make decisions for you in a match it is never your friend. It will sing the siren song of shooting beyond your skill sets with predictable unpleasant results. The skills you bring that day are the only skills you have. No amount of desire will change that. Shoot your own game. Let the results sort themselves out after the match. My bet is that not only will you do better but you will enjoy the sport more. Rick Korzep.

#3 BSeevers

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 10:46 AM

Tough love here I never give advice with a filter. Very dangerous since clarity and honesty are blocked when you do. Your personal goals determine what you want and need to hear but since you posted I think you wanna improve

You are doing a common error of shooting with expectations. You post seems to have that theme all through it. If you are cussing at early development of shooting skills I think this kinda points to that.

I would also dry fire a lot. It only costs time and will fix those draws, reloads and help you see the sights properly. Your saying that you see the sights but you are not. Sorry to be so blunt but unless your gun is broke you are not seeing the sights and you will struggle especially later because you won't be calling your shots. That is the biggest secret to shooting hyper fast.

Don't be so rigid in stage breakdown and visualization. Maybe try seeing 'pictures" of target arrays instead of the entire run.

Relax and just shoot.

Quit trying and start doing.
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#4 HoMiE

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 10:55 AM

How much did you practice for this weeks match? How many hours did you spend dry firing?

Watching your video, on that first stage you seem to be in control then on those last 4 target array you just seem like you went in to double-tap mode, tap-tap, pause, tap-tap, pause, tap-tap, pause, tap-tap. Did you call your shots or were you thinking im shooting this to slow i need to hurry up? Go back and read your description of your stage breakdown, it is i shot this stage in this many seconds and I thought I called all my shoots but I had half As and Half Charlies and 2 mikes. Not to be a d#$k but if your miking a couple of targets on every stage, your not calling your shoots. Don't worry about how your finish compared to whoever is shooting. Focus on your own abilities. There is no magical 'zen' moment if your not executing the fundamentals. And I've seen it time and time again, if you don't put in the practice and get out and go shoot, how do you expect to get any better? Be honest and do a self analysis of your shooting. If your serious, write down your weaknesses, make a plan of what your going to work on, set goals and work on them. There is no short cut or 'zen' mode that will make you a better shooter. You have to practice and work at things. I read your post and I sense frustration and you say you get burned out. Tip for you, on your next match, don't worry about your score, just try to shoot Alphas. Thats it, one goal, shoot alphas. During the week, work on your draw, make sure you get a good grip if its poor and just shoot As. Have fun while doing it.
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#5 JakeMartens

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 01:57 PM

Here is what happened today...1st stage at South Central Gun Club in Freetown, IN. I shot a 30-32 round stage in 20 seconds(ish) shooting Limited.


So if you memorized the stage was it 30 rounds or 32 rounds

http://ingunowners.c...400-post25.html

that I forgot the target on the left. YES, I DID MEMORIZE THE STAGE

As a person that has shot with you many many times I feel that we should close this thread, and move it to DOODIEPROJECT forum so that we can use the type of language that needs to be to explain what you are doing wrong.
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#6 hunt_fish

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 02:35 PM

You seem to be worried about time - you can't push your speed in a match.

You need to go in with the mindset of shooting A's - push the speed in practise and shoot A's in the match.

Also, you appear to be shooting on the move quite a lot - if you can't do this accurately you may be better off moving faster and shooting from fixed positions (a short term fix to try improve accuracy - you need to practise shooting on the move to make sure you don't miss!).

+1 on dryfire too

#7 Coach

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 05:32 PM

Tough love here I never give advice with a filter. Very dangerous since clarity and honesty are blocked when you do. Your personal goals determine what you want and need to hear but since you posted I think you wanna improve

You are doing a common error of shooting with expectations. You post seems to have that theme all through it. If you are cussing at early development of shooting skills I think this kinda points to that.

I would also dry fire a lot. It only costs time and will fix those draws, reloads and help you see the sights properly. Your saying that you see the sights but you are not. Sorry to be so blunt but unless your gun is broke you are not seeing the sights and you will struggle especially later because you won't be calling your shots. That is the biggest secret to shooting hyper fast.

Don't be so rigid in stage breakdown and visualization. Maybe try seeing 'pictures" of target arrays instead of the entire run.

Relax and just shoot.

Quit trying and start doing.


So people who win national championships in this sport never arrive at the match expecting to win?
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#8 downrange72

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 06:11 PM

For some reason I can't quote from my phone.

Don't worry, my feeling don't hurt easily.

I generally don't practice. It is a lack of time (sometimes away from home all week)and funding issue. Yes I could dry fire more, no excuse here. I shoot nearly every weekend. My performance tends to peak in the summer and fall off in the winter

I understand the concept of mental conditioning. It just appears that a majority of the time I feel I've had the "aha" moment as described by others, it really isn't.
Does this gun make my butt look fat?

#9 downrange72

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 07:49 PM

When I say I see the sights, I honestly believe I do. However, as I mentioned earlier, I could be staring over the rear or have the gun 'cock eyed'. This has happened in the past and I know it happens on steel.

Watching your video, on that first stage you seem to be in control then on those last 4 target array you just seem like you went in to double-tap mode, tap-tap, pause, tap-tap, pause, tap-tap, pause, tap-tap. Did you call your shots or were you thinking im shooting this to slow i need to hurry up?....
[/quote]

The miss in the last array was the last shot...I think. You are correct, it was double tap mode and it was all A-C with an A-M. I'm going to guess the last shot was over the shoulder on the left side (I felt there was a miss on the 2nd target going in, I transitioned back to it. I'm going to guess in reality that I snapped the eyes before I saw the shot break on the last target). One of the other misses was on the first target on the Right side. I'm guessing that I was bouncing as I was moving. In hindsight, I wasn't comfortable with that target when I was moving. The third mike was somewhere in that array through the port on the Right.


[quote name='JakeMartens' timestamp='1349125047' post='1789478']
[quote name='downrange72' timestamp='1349054059' post='1788943']
Here is what happened today...1st stage at South Central Gun Club in Freetown, IN. I shot a 30-32 round stage in 20 seconds(ish) shooting Limited.[/quote]

So if you memorized the stage was it 30 rounds or 32 rounds

http://ingunowners.c...400-post25.html

that I forgot the target on the left. YES, I DID MEMORIZE THE STAGE

As a person that has shot with you many many times I feel that we should close this thread, and move it to DOODIEPROJECT forum so that we can use the type of language that needs to be to explain what you are doing wrong.
[/quote]

32 rounds and you are a doodie head ;).

The FTE was on a 30 round COF. Should have broke down 16-14 (could have also been 18-12 and which is how I should have shot it). I however shot 16-8-4 :D.

Edited by downrange72, 01 October 2012 - 07:51 PM.

Does this gun make my butt look fat?

#10 downrange72

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 08:03 PM

You seem to be worried about time - you can't push your speed in a match.

You need to go in with the mindset of shooting A's - push the speed in practise and shoot A's in the match.

Also, you appear to be shooting on the move quite a lot - if you can't do this accurately you may be better off moving faster and shooting from fixed positions (a short term fix to try improve accuracy - you need to practise shooting on the move to make sure you don't miss!).

+1 on dryfire too


I understand shooting alphas and that being the focus. I normally shoot my fair share.
Below is the score sheet from last week. Granted, the times were very slow in comparison to Production and Single Stack Shooters.

http://www.uspsa.org...=6290&compid=27

The Bravo came on a target that left mostly the head to shoot at. I was aiming high. It wasn't a recoil bravo. The Delta, I'm not sure what happened.

The match this week was a "NO" Match...meaning no hardcover (except classifier), no no shoots, no shots over 15 yards. I feel that most of the time when I'm overconfident, Karma likes to slap me back to reality. I may have been feeling a little too confident prior to shooting.

Edited by downrange72, 01 October 2012 - 08:05 PM.

Does this gun make my butt look fat?

#11 BSeevers

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 01:26 PM


Tough love here I never give advice with a filter. Very dangerous since clarity and honesty are blocked when you do. Your personal goals determine what you want and need to hear but since you posted I think you wanna improve

You are doing a common error of shooting with expectations. You post seems to have that theme all through it. If you are cussing at early development of shooting skills I think this kinda points to that.

I would also dry fire a lot. It only costs time and will fix those draws, reloads and help you see the sights properly. Your saying that you see the sights but you are not. Sorry to be so blunt but unless your gun is broke you are not seeing the sights and you will struggle especially later because you won't be calling your shots. That is the biggest secret to shooting hyper fast.

Don't be so rigid in stage breakdown and visualization. Maybe try seeing 'pictures" of target arrays instead of the entire run.

Relax and just shoot.

Quit trying and start doing.


So people who win national championships in this sport never arrive at the match expecting to win?

Humm When I shoot well it usually starts with my attitude and I come to the match expecting to win and realistically have already won the match in my mind. That is not what I was saying.

Expectations are attitudes that keep you from excelling and winning. Quite a few shooters are more concerned about other shooters perception and their perception of what they want others to see them as. That will hold you back. Expectations cause you to shoot before the sight is there. "I am an A class fast shooter and I always shoot faster than everybody else" might be what's rolling around in their head. Or I have to push it or I won't win the club match like I did last month. There are many variations.It is there in the thread starters post.
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#12 Sam

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 03:06 AM

Don't be so tough on yourself. For the amount of time and effort invested, you are doing well. Relax and enjoy the journey. Your scores will improve....
The world can appear to be so empty if one thinks only of mountains, rivers, and even cities; but to know someone here and there who thinks and feels along with us, and though distant, is close to us in kindred spirit - this makes the earth seem like a 'peopled garden.' - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

#13 Steve Anderson

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 07:41 AM

"I generally don't practice. It is a lack of time (sometimes away from home all week)and funding issue. Yes I could dry fire more, no excuse here. I shoot nearly every weekend. My performance tends to peak in the summer and fall off in the winter"

Seriously?

Come back when you're ready to change that.

Or, accept that you just want to have fun shooting and quit looking at the results.

My third book, "Get to Work: The Practice of More Ponits per Second" is now available at AndersonShooting.com and Amazon.com

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#14 daves_not_here

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 08:41 AM

Check the accuracy of your gun with some slow deliberate grouping at 20 yards. Say do fifty shots all As.

That often improves my gun...

Know what I mean?

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#15 benos

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 02:49 PM

I posted this somewhere under "The Set" topic, but rather than searching for it:

The Set

With an empty gun, without drawing, assume your index position. Take a moment and move your attention slowly up from your waist, through your chest, then up into your head, out through your arms and into your grip. Notice and remember the calm feeling you have in your mind and face, and your perfect grip and arm tension. Remember your mind, face, arm, and grip tension as one calm feeling. Call the totality of the feeling "The Set."

(Assigning a name to a group of remembered feelings makes it easier to summon The Set on demand.)

Now without a start beep, summon the feeling of The Set, and draw to your index position, keeping all of your attention on the feeling on the feeling of The Set throughout the draw.

Repeat drawing to The Set over and over, until are completely certain of its total feeling, and complete confident in your ability to draw to The Set. Make that a part of your daily practice.

Especially important is being aware of a feeling of total nuetrality in your grip, which is remembered as one feeling.

Then take The Set to the practice range. Allow yourself not to work on any other skills until you know you are always shooting within The Set.

At "Shooter Ready," exhale slightly, at "Stand By," summon the feeling of The Set ... and this is the key ... along with the command to preserve the feeling of The Set right through the buzzer and the draw - until the first shot fires.

The further hone your ability to summon The Set by repeating the above at the beginning of each stage in every match.

If a stage has movement, train to summon The Set as you move into each new position.

Once my skill set was complete, summoning The Set was all I cared about.
be
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#16 JakeMartens

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 03:26 PM

That is all well and good, but Mike is a head case

this is the same guy that says he burns in a stage, but says stage planning is BS,
and is surprised that when he says he has a plan and then forgets a target

he says he sees his sights, but also knows he is looking over them

Mikes worst enemy is Mike. Everything that everyone has put on here he has been taught, retention is another issue
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#17 downrange72

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 12:43 AM

Jake.

I'm telling you that I can close my eyes at the start, I can shoot the Array of targets. When the buzzer goes off, something happens. I don't feel stressed at the line, I don't feel anything.

Head case, probably. But if you look back, you will see that my results fall off at the end of the year as well. Regression vs. progression. The first year, I don't remember.

Right now, the last time I was able to practice, my 20 yard shot was "okay." It is not the gun, shocker :)

Steve,

I'll have to try going back and just shooting to have fun. This weeks reflection has me leaning towards hanging up competition and just plinking when I can. This thought has happened in the past, but has never held on as long as this.
Maybe a day or two. This week I'm on day four. The frustration vs fun is definitely going the wrong way

I'm going to shoot steel on Saturday and possibly call it a year. It will depend on how it feels.
Does this gun make my butt look fat?

#18 downrange72

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 12:47 AM

I posted this somewhere under "The Set" topic, but rather than searching for it:

The Set

With an empty gun, without drawing, assume your index position. Take a moment and move your attention slowly up from your waist, through your chest, then up into your head, out through your arms and into your grip. Notice and remember the calm feeling you have in your mind and face, and your perfect grip and arm tension. Remember your mind, face, arm, and grip tension as one calm feeling. Call the totality of the feeling "The Set."

(Assigning a name to a group of remembered feelings makes it easier to summon The Set on demand.)

Now without a start beep, summon the feeling of The Set, and draw to your index position, keeping all of your attention on the feeling on the feeling of The Set throughout the draw.

Repeat drawing to The Set over and over, until are completely certain of its total feeling, and complete confident in your ability to draw to The Set. Make that a part of your daily practice.

Especially important is being aware of a feeling of total nuetrality in your grip, which is remembered as one feeling.

Then take The Set to the practice range. Allow yourself not to work on any other skills until you know you are always shooting within The Set.

At "Shooter Ready," exhale slightly, at "Stand By," summon the feeling of The Set ... and this is the key ... along with the command to preserve the feeling of The Set right through the buzzer and the draw - until the first shot fires.

The further hone your ability to summon The Set by repeating the above at the beginning of each stage in every match.

If a stage has movement, train to summon The Set as you move into each new position.

Once my skill set was complete, summoning The Set was all I cared about.
be


Thanks. I will definitely try this if I shoot the next weekend.

I'll have some time for reflection over the next 8 weeks to try another mind set
Does this gun make my butt look fat?

#19 lugnut

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 06:41 AM

Hmmm. Lots of juicy stuff here. First off in the first video you seemed to have much more shooting on the move. You say you see your sights but I'm sure (and you have to be sure) that you aren't seeing them when the shot breaks. I too have a similar challenge as I'm working on shot calling.

I've had similar issues as you on occasion. I feel calm and ready but sometimes my performance is poor. I do practice and it IS frustrating. I believe in my case and possibly in yours- your self image needs work. Might sound goofy and you might not think it explains things but I think it does. Of course you need practice too. Someone else said it... but if you are thinking about your performance relative to others too much this can also cause the problems you have as well.

I love this quote.. especially the last part.

"Life's battles don't always go to the stronger or faster man. But sooner or later the man who wins, is the man who thinks he can."
-- Vince Lombardi



Edited by lugnut, 04 October 2012 - 06:43 AM.

"Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence." Vince Lombardi

#20 toothguy

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 09:16 AM


I posted this somewhere under "The Set" topic, but rather than searching for it:

The Set

With an empty gun, without drawing, assume your index position. Take a moment and move your attention slowly up from your waist, through your chest, then up into your head, out through your arms and into your grip. Notice and remember the calm feeling you have in your mind and face, and your perfect grip and arm tension. Remember your mind, face, arm, and grip tension as one calm feeling. Call the totality of the feeling "The Set."

(Assigning a name to a group of remembered feelings makes it easier to summon The Set on demand.)

Now without a start beep, summon the feeling of The Set, and draw to your index position, keeping all of your attention on the feeling on the feeling of The Set throughout the draw.

Repeat drawing to The Set over and over, until are completely certain of its total feeling, and complete confident in your ability to draw to The Set. Make that a part of your daily practice.

Especially important is being aware of a feeling of total nuetrality in your grip, which is remembered as one feeling.

Then take The Set to the practice range. Allow yourself not to work on any other skills until you know you are always shooting within The Set.

At "Shooter Ready," exhale slightly, at "Stand By," summon the feeling of The Set ... and this is the key ... along with the command to preserve the feeling of The Set right through the buzzer and the draw - until the first shot fires.

The further hone your ability to summon The Set by repeating the above at the beginning of each stage in every match.

If a stage has movement, train to summon The Set as you move into each new position.

Once my skill set was complete, summoning The Set was all I cared about.
be


Thanks. I will definitely try this if I shoot the next weekend.

I'll have some time for reflection over the next 8 weeks to try another mind set


Please visit Steve Anderson's vendor tent. Sometimes all we need is a plan to follow, some structure.

Edited by toothguy, 04 October 2012 - 11:07 AM.

The drive to want to win is only an asset when it pushes you to practice better/more and develop your mental game. When you let it make decisions for you in a match it is never your friend. It will sing the siren song of shooting beyond your skill sets with predictable unpleasant results. The skills you bring that day are the only skills you have. No amount of desire will change that. Shoot your own game. Let the results sort themselves out after the match. My bet is that not only will you do better but you will enjoy the sport more. Rick Korzep.

#21 Chris iliff

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 02:32 PM

It's simple. We make it hard. I do the same.

Having RO'd and shot with you countless times, here is my .02 cents.

Shoot, then move, shoot, then move.

I've seen you absolutely shred stages. You are more than capable. Make your next match a point match.

Point has a double meaning. First, shoot for points. Second, shoot from specific points during the stage. It's really all there is to it. NO shooting on the move. Yikes, did I say that!!! Yep, I sure did.

If yo do that with your gun up you are going to rocket up the standings.

I think sometimes we all go through periods of just trying to do too much. It's great to do and learn from, but our expectations get artificially inflated and then our SELF IMAGE can take a beating. Been there, done that. So, to get out of it I say simplify. Buzzer, gun up, shoot A's, move with gun up, shoot A's, repeat.

You shooting This weekend? I'm going to Max Bedwells match, I forget the range name.

Edited by Chris iliff, 04 October 2012 - 02:35 PM.

"Don't be a brown banana". a Cocobolo comment.

lef-t, on 22 Dec 2013 - 11:53 AM, said:
I'm redirecting my focus onto "doing" something rather than "not doing" something.

#22 downrange72

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 03:21 PM

Thanks everyone. I'm taking this weekend off. The urge to shoot is not there. Usually it only lasts 24 hours, but this week I'm on hour 96. I'm not sure when ill get the opportunity again. I'll be working 6-7 days a week for 10-12 hours for at least the next few weeks. Surgery is delayed for insurance reasons.
Does this gun make my butt look fat?

#23 downrange72

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 03:37 PM

It's simple. We make it hard. I do the same.

Having RO'd and shot with you countless times, here is my .02 cents.

Shoot, then move, shoot, then move.

I've seen you absolutely shred stages. You are more than capable. Make your next match a point match.

Point has a double meaning. First, shoot for points. Second, shoot from specific points during the stage. It's really all there is to it. NO shooting on the move. Yikes, did I say that!!! Yep, I sure did.

If yo do that with your gun up you are going to rocket up the standings.

I think sometimes we all go through periods of just trying to do too much. It's great to do and learn from, but our expectations get artificially inflated and then our SELF IMAGE can take a beating. Been there, done that. So, to get out of it I say simplify. Buzzer, gun up, shoot A's, move with gun up, shoot A's, repeat.

You shooting This weekend? I'm going to Max Bedwells match, I forget the range name.


South Central.

Thinking back and talking to a few people. I don't think about te ankle hurting when I shoot, but my brother tells me I stil l limp when moving. Perhaps , the "hop" is throwing off the shot while on the move? Just a thought. If I'm able to shoot again this season ill try the station to station shooting instead.
Does this gun make my butt look fat?

#24 Chris iliff

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 05:57 PM

Jeff is right, you do have a little hitch. But, you can move! I've seen you do it. I hope you shoot some more. Always fun shooting with you and Jeff. I know the squad is going to run smooth and I'm in good company for the day.

Seriously, SIMPLIFY. Wish you'd shoot South Central, we'd squad and work on some stuff together!!

Take care.
"Don't be a brown banana". a Cocobolo comment.

lef-t, on 22 Dec 2013 - 11:53 AM, said:
I'm redirecting my focus onto "doing" something rather than "not doing" something.

#25 Sam

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 10:41 PM

The Set....one of my favorite be posts of all time! :)
The world can appear to be so empty if one thinks only of mountains, rivers, and even cities; but to know someone here and there who thinks and feels along with us, and though distant, is close to us in kindred spirit - this makes the earth seem like a 'peopled garden.' - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe




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