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9mm Lee FCD - Glock Bulge


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#1 Woody Allen

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 08:41 PM

Dillon decapper sizing die vs. Lee decapping sizing die vs. Hornady decapper sizing die vs. EGW Lee undersize decapping sizing die vs. Lee Factory Crimp die.

Using an aftermarket barrel, such as a Barsto or KKM, the Dillon will not size down far enough to ensure 100% of the rounds will chamber. Regardless of correctly installing the die, i.e., touching the plate. Some rounds will pass the case gauge but will stick when you chamber check.

Lee decapping sizing die
EGW Lee undersize decapping sizing die
Hornady decapper sizing die

All three of the above will remove the Glock bulge ensuring 100% will chamber.
All three make the press more difficult to operate-you are really "working" the brass.
The Dillon decapper sizing die does not make the press more difficult to operating.

The carbide sizing ring on the Lee Factory Crimp die removes the Glock bulge ensuring 100% will chamber.
Using FMJ bullets, you need a minimum if any bell to seat the bullet.
Adjusting the Lee FCD to just "kiss" the case rim will allow the carbide sizing die to remove the bulge without "resizing" the round skewing the bullet in relation to the case.

The diameter of the Lee FCD carbide sizing ring is larger that the Lee undersize die and the extra sizing by the Lee undersize die is not needed-overworks the brass.

Reality-9mm brass fired through a Glock barrel may have expanded and not chamber in a Barsto or KKM barrel.
Yes, it would be better to buy new brass (or once-fired not through a Glock) and use this brass-but not practical for some.

The Lee FCD is THE solution. It does not over work the brass. Set up as above it just "kisses" the bulge away.

I am weak and lazy. I want the press to operate with as little resistance as possible. I want to load as many rounds as I can as fast as I can. I want all rounds to chamber. I want to use the brass as many times as I can (I don't want to overwork the brass). I want an acceptable level of accuracy. I want Hillary Clinton and Nancy Pelosi to .......have a nice day.

Anyone find the same results as listed above. Should Lee receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his Lee FCD?

Yes, I am an internet troll and I will now slither off to my home under the freeway overpass.

Edited by Woody Allen, 08 April 2010 - 08:59 PM.


#2 steel1212

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 09:04 PM

Dillon decapper sizing die vs. Lee decapping sizing die vs. Hornady decapper sizing die vs. EGW Lee undersize decapping sizing die vs. Lee Factory Crimp die.

Using an aftermarket barrel, such as a Barsto or KKM, the Dillon will not size down far enough to ensure 100% of the rounds will chamber. Regardless of correctly installing the die, i.e., touching the plate. Some rounds will pass the case gauge but will stick when you chamber check.

Lee decapping sizing die
EGW Lee undersize decapping sizing die
Hornady decapper sizing die

All three of the above will remove the Glock bulge ensuring 100% will chamber.
All three make the press more difficult to operate-you are really "working" the brass.
The Dillon decapper sizing die does not make the press more difficult to operating.

The carbide sizing ring on the Lee Factory Crimp die removes the Glock bulge ensuring 100% will chamber.
Using FMJ bullets, you need a minimum if any bell to seat the bullet.
Adjusting the Lee FCD to just "kiss" the case rim will allow the carbide sizing die to remove the bulge without "resizing" the round skewing the bullet in relation to the case.

The diameter of the Lee FCD carbide sizing ring is larger that the Lee undersize die and the extra sizing by the Lee undersize die is not needed-overworks the brass.

Reality-9mm brass fired through a Glock barrel may have expanded and not chamber in a Barsto or KKM barrel.
Yes, it would be better to buy new brass (or once-fired not through a Glock) and use this brass-but not practical for some.

The Lee FCD is THE solution. It does not over work the brass. Set up as above it just "kisses" the bulge away.

I am weak and lazy. I want the press to operate with as little resistance as possible. I want to load as many rounds as I can as fast as I can. I want all rounds to chamber. I want to use the brass as many times as I can (I don't want to overwork the brass). I want an acceptable level of accuracy. I want Hillary Clinton and Nancy Pelosi to .......have a nice day.

Anyone find the same results as listed above. Should Lee receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his Lee FCD?

Yes, I am an internet troll and I will now slither off to my home under the freeway overpass.




So what dies do you use as your setup as I'm a little confused. Do you use a dillon size die and a Lee FCD or a lee size die and a lee FCD?


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#3 Woody Allen

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 09:09 PM


Dillon decapper sizing die vs. Lee decapping sizing die vs. Hornady decapper sizing die vs. EGW Lee undersize decapping sizing die vs. Lee Factory Crimp die.

Using an aftermarket barrel, such as a Barsto or KKM, the Dillon will not size down far enough to ensure 100% of the rounds will chamber. Regardless of correctly installing the die, i.e., touching the plate. Some rounds will pass the case gauge but will stick when you chamber check.

Lee decapping sizing die
EGW Lee undersize decapping sizing die
Hornady decapper sizing die

All three of the above will remove the Glock bulge ensuring 100% will chamber.
All three make the press more difficult to operate-you are really "working" the brass.
The Dillon decapper sizing die does not make the press more difficult to operating.

The carbide sizing ring on the Lee Factory Crimp die removes the Glock bulge ensuring 100% will chamber.
Using FMJ bullets, you need a minimum if any bell to seat the bullet.
Adjusting the Lee FCD to just "kiss" the case rim will allow the carbide sizing die to remove the bulge without "resizing" the round skewing the bullet in relation to the case.

The diameter of the Lee FCD carbide sizing ring is larger that the Lee undersize die and the extra sizing by the Lee undersize die is not needed-overworks the brass.

Reality-9mm brass fired through a Glock barrel may have expanded and not chamber in a Barsto or KKM barrel.
Yes, it would be better to buy new brass (or once-fired not through a Glock) and use this brass-but not practical for some.

The Lee FCD is THE solution. It does not over work the brass. Set up as above it just "kisses" the bulge away.

I am weak and lazy. I want the press to operate with as little resistance as possible. I want to load as many rounds as I can as fast as I can. I want all rounds to chamber. I want to use the brass as many times as I can (I don't want to overwork the brass). I want an acceptable level of accuracy. I want Hillary Clinton and Nancy Pelosi to .......have a nice day.

Anyone find the same results as listed above. Should Lee receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his Lee FCD?

Yes, I am an internet troll and I will now slither off to my home under the freeway overpass.




So what dies do you use as your setup as I'm a little confused. Do you use a dillon size die and a Lee FCD or a lee size die and a lee FCD?



All Dillon dies except for the last die-a Lee FCD (on a 650). The Lee FCD carbide sizing ring does want I need-kisses the bulge at the bottom of the case. The other dies will also in Station 1 on a 650, but they overwork the brass and make the press more difficult to operate. It is all about RPM (rounds per minute loaded) and LPC (loads per case).

Edited by Woody Allen, 08 April 2010 - 09:13 PM.


#4 G-ManBart

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 09:20 PM

The FCD works the brass twice as much as a tight resizing die does...it works it in both directions. Brass gets brittle by working it multiple times more than it will be squeezing it slightly harder half as many times. It also squeezes the case below the bullet which can cause a loss of neck tension. It's not the answer, it's the easiest way to hide a problem.

Run something like the Dillon die in station #1, then a tighter resizing die in station #2 and the effort to operate the press drops significantly and won't cut back on your RPM. R,
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#5 Woody Allen

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 04:04 AM

The FCD works the brass twice as much as a tight resizing die does...it works it in both directions. Brass gets brittle by working it multiple times more than it will be squeezing it slightly harder half as many times. It also squeezes the case below the bullet which can cause a loss of neck tension. It's not the answer, it's the easiest way to hide a problem.

Run something like the Dillon die in station #1, then a tighter resizing die in station #2 and the effort to operate the press drops significantly and won't cut back on your RPM. R,


Your wrong. Take a case and run it through the EGW undersize die and measure. Take a case and run it through the Dillon decapping and sizing die, then through the Lee FCD with it adjusted so that only the carbide sizing ring kissing the case and measure. Take the guts out of the Lee FCD and run a case through it and measure.

After you do the above come back and admit you were wrong.

#6 Sarge

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 04:24 AM

In my short experience with the EGW U die in 9mm the press is, at most, 10-15% harder to operate. Most rounds feel no different than when I was using a Dillon die. A few are much harder, but very few.
If the brass is properly lubed the effects on press operation are minimal and vastly overstated.

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#7 LPatterson

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 06:30 AM

The 9mm is a tapered case so spray it with one shot to take away the effort and unless you are shooting 9 major you'll probably lose them before they split.
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#8 dbxdm9

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 11:03 AM

I had lots of trouble getting Glock'd brass to resize without causing a rim to form. Since 9mm is a tapered case you can't find a decent machine-based solution. Even though my sizing die is carbide - I started to lube them up (a lot) with One Shot. Now, the die seems to smooth over the bulge rather than push it into a rim. No more throwing out 80% of my range brass.
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#9 kevin c

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 01:12 PM

Another option is a CasePro.

Pricey, it's true. An extra step and more time, also. But it works very well.

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#10 G-ManBart

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 09:37 PM


The FCD works the brass twice as much as a tight resizing die does...it works it in both directions. Brass gets brittle by working it multiple times more than it will be squeezing it slightly harder half as many times. It also squeezes the case below the bullet which can cause a loss of neck tension. It's not the answer, it's the easiest way to hide a problem.

Run something like the Dillon die in station #1, then a tighter resizing die in station #2 and the effort to operate the press drops significantly and won't cut back on your RPM. R,


Your wrong. Take a case and run it through the EGW undersize die and measure. Take a case and run it through the Dillon decapping and sizing die, then through the Lee FCD with it adjusted so that only the carbide sizing ring kissing the case and measure. Take the guts out of the Lee FCD and run a case through it and measure.

After you do the above come back and admit you were wrong.


Well, aren't you the pleasant poster <_<

I'm not wrong, you just didn't understand what I wrote.

I wasn't talking about the diameter, I was talking about how many "cycles", for lack of a better term, you're putting on the brass.

Edited by G-ManBart, 09 April 2010 - 09:38 PM.

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#11 Woody Allen

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 01:03 AM



The FCD works the brass twice as much as a tight resizing die does...it works it in both directions. Brass gets brittle by working it multiple times more than it will be squeezing it slightly harder half as many times. It also squeezes the case below the bullet which can cause a loss of neck tension. It's not the answer, it's the easiest way to hide a problem.

Run something like the Dillon die in station #1, then a tighter resizing die in station #2 and the effort to operate the press drops significantly and won't cut back on your RPM. R,


Your wrong. Take a case and run it through the EGW undersize die and measure. Take a case and run it through the Dillon decapping and sizing die, then through the Lee FCD with it adjusted so that only the carbide sizing ring kissing the case and measure. Take the guts out of the Lee FCD and run a case through it and measure.

After you do the above come back and admit you were wrong.


Well, aren't you the pleasant poster <_<

I'm not wrong, you just didn't understand what I wrote.

I wasn't talking about the diameter, I was talking about how many "cycles", for lack of a better term, you're putting on the brass.


You wrote "The FCD works the brass twice as much as a tight resizing die does...it works it in both directions."

Adjusting the Lee FCD as outlined does NOT work the brass twice as much as a tight resizing die does.... It works it LESS.

The carbide ring in the Lee FCD is larger and does not size the case as much as the EGW undersize die. The "extra" sizing done by the EGW die is not needed.

Each time the case is fired the case expands. Each time the case is reloaded the case is resized,i.e., a cycle. Each cycle the brass is "worked" less with the Lee FCD if adjusted as outlined. The carbide ring on the Lee FCD sizes the case about 2.0 from the bottom of the case-just were it is needed. Doesn't affect neck tension. Doesn't do anything else to the case. Run a factory loaded case through the Lee FCD adjusted as outlined, the die does absolutely nothing whatsoever to the round. Run a case that has been through the Dillon decapping sizing die through the Lee FCD it does absolutely nothing whatsoever to the round except for that portion 2.0 from the bottom of the case.

The Lee FCD IS ADJUSTED to affect the case only 2.0 from the bottom of the round. All that is needed right where it is needed. You adjust the Lee FCD so that it only molests the case near the bottom of the round. The rest of the case is virginal, unmolested, pure, and unperverted by the evil FCD. You are not utilizing the "crimp" in the Factory Crimp Die (FCD).

Again, if you use a calipers and measure the cases as suggested, you will find out for yourself.

Edited by Woody Allen, 10 April 2010 - 01:30 AM.


#12 diehli

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 03:20 AM

Dillon sizing die = 1 working.
Lee FCD = 1 working because Dillon die doesn't size it enough.
Total = 2 workings.

EGW U die = 1 working.
Lee FCD = 0 workings because brass is sized sufficiently.
Total = 1 working.

At least that's the theory.
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#13 G-ManBart

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 08:22 AM




The FCD works the brass twice as much as a tight resizing die does...it works it in both directions. Brass gets brittle by working it multiple times more than it will be squeezing it slightly harder half as many times. It also squeezes the case below the bullet which can cause a loss of neck tension. It's not the answer, it's the easiest way to hide a problem.

Run something like the Dillon die in station #1, then a tighter resizing die in station #2 and the effort to operate the press drops significantly and won't cut back on your RPM. R,


Your wrong. Take a case and run it through the EGW undersize die and measure. Take a case and run it through the Dillon decapping and sizing die, then through the Lee FCD with it adjusted so that only the carbide sizing ring kissing the case and measure. Take the guts out of the Lee FCD and run a case through it and measure.

After you do the above come back and admit you were wrong.


Well, aren't you the pleasant poster <_<

I'm not wrong, you just didn't understand what I wrote.

I wasn't talking about the diameter, I was talking about how many "cycles", for lack of a better term, you're putting on the brass.


You wrote "The FCD works the brass twice as much as a tight resizing die does...it works it in both directions."

Adjusting the Lee FCD as outlined does NOT work the brass twice as much as a tight resizing die does.... It works it LESS.

The carbide ring in the Lee FCD is larger and does not size the case as much as the EGW undersize die. The "extra" sizing done by the EGW die is not needed.

Each time the case is fired the case expands. Each time the case is reloaded the case is resized,i.e., a cycle. Each cycle the brass is "worked" less with the Lee FCD if adjusted as outlined. The carbide ring on the Lee FCD sizes the case about 2.0 from the bottom of the case-just were it is needed. Doesn't affect neck tension. Doesn't do anything else to the case. Run a factory loaded case through the Lee FCD adjusted as outlined, the die does absolutely nothing whatsoever to the round. Run a case that has been through the Dillon decapping sizing die through the Lee FCD it does absolutely nothing whatsoever to the round except for that portion 2.0 from the bottom of the case.

The Lee FCD IS ADJUSTED to affect the case only 2.0 from the bottom of the round. All that is needed right where it is needed. You adjust the Lee FCD so that it only molests the case near the bottom of the round. The rest of the case is virginal, unmolested, pure, and unperverted by the evil FCD. You are not utilizing the "crimp" in the Factory Crimp Die (FCD).

Again, if you use a calipers and measure the cases as suggested, you will find out for yourself.


Diehli hit the basics one post up.

It's not about the amount of resizing being done, in inches, it's the number of times the case gets sized each time you load it...well that and WHERE the resizing is happening on the case.

To test your theory, I ran a loaded round that had a bullet seated (and only the flare removed) through a 9mm FCD after measuring it carefully. Guess what? It got .002" longer....it's squeezing the case below the bullet, which is NOT GOOD. That was with the die adjusted so the carbide ring would just get to the bottom of the case.

Hey, if you would rather use a die that hides problems, rather than fixing them from the start, have at it...heck, I should hope that more people would go this route so that when the wheels come off it makes them that much easier to beat at a match :)

Edited by G-ManBart, 10 April 2010 - 08:28 AM.

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#14 Yardbird

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 12:29 PM

The FCD will not size the case below the bullet. A standard sizing die is tighter than the FCD. The FCD only sizes the bullet portion of the case with a bullet in it. I have run cases through my standard die and then the FCD and the FCD does not even touch the case.
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#15 Nik Habicht

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 01:18 PM

Hey, if you would rather use a die that hides problems, rather than fixing them from the start, have at it...heck, I should hope that more people would go this route so that when the wheels come off it makes them that much easier to beat at a match :)

Have much experience loading with a Lee FCD? Thousands of rounds? The wheels are definitely gonna fall off?

Color me a happy FCD user for close to 100,000 in three calibers -- bulk of that in 9mm, little bit in .40 and .45 -- no ammo issues, no need to case gauge, no seriously increased effort on the press, not seeing much wear and tear on practice brass....
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#16 G-ManBart

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 08:33 PM


Hey, if you would rather use a die that hides problems, rather than fixing them from the start, have at it...heck, I should hope that more people would go this route so that when the wheels come off it makes them that much easier to beat at a match :)

Have much experience loading with a Lee FCD? Thousands of rounds? The wheels are definitely gonna fall off?

Color me a happy FCD user for close to 100,000 in three calibers -- bulk of that in 9mm, little bit in .40 and .45 -- no ammo issues, no need to case gauge, no seriously increased effort on the press, not seeing much wear and tear on practice brass....


No, I haven't loaded many rounds with them....for a reason :) I have one or two on the shelf (think I may have given one away) and it's a solution to a problem that doesn't, or shouldn't, exist. Sufficient bullet pull should come from resizing the case properly, not squeezing after a bullet is already seated. As I said in that other post, I carefully measured a round with a bullet seated, ran it through the FCD, adjusted as the OP suggested, and the round was .002" longer....that's not exactly a positive sign.

I suspect that if someone is careful in other areas they could load good ammo using a FCD, but that's not why or how most people seem to be using them....they're covering up other issues. R,

Edited by G-ManBart, 10 April 2010 - 08:40 PM.

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#17 Yardbird

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 07:16 AM

I just ran two checks on my 650 and the FCD does not change the OAL of my cartridges at all.
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#18 jrb06

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 08:44 AM

Been using the FCD in 9,40,and 45 and did the test to see if it makes the round longer none of the rounds became longer after using the FCD. To be as precise as possible and all things the same all measurments were taken with a micrometer not a dial caliper before and after running through the die. All rounds were left to normilize on the bench for 1 hour prior to measurment and then left alone on the bench for one hour after resize before final measurment. This was done with factory rounds for refrence and then reloaded rounds.

#19 winter5470

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 11:07 AM

Sarge - glad the die worked for you. I thought the increased effort using the EGW U 9mm die, even with case lube, was too much AND the powder funnel stuck on the upstroke causing powder to spill.
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#20 Woody Allen

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 05:17 PM

Update. I was upstairs and heard a ruckus in the basement. I went downstairs and found the Lee FCD on my laptop watching inappropriate material while drinking my beer and smoking my cigars. My dog was cowering and then walked bowlegged up the stairs.


DO NOT let this device into your home!!!

Edited by Woody Allen, 11 April 2010 - 06:16 PM.


#21 98sr20ve

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 06:20 PM

Anyone find the same results as listed above. Should Lee receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his Lee FCD?

Yes, I am an internet troll and I will now slither off to my home under the freeway overpass.


Flip over a Lee Carbide FCD and a standard Lee Carbide Sizing die. Take a close look. Besides the part in the die that provides the crimp they look exactly the same. Now measure them. Sizing die is .006 smaller then the FCD on average. So if the FCD is a Miracle what is the Lee sizing die? 6 miracles? Or is that .006 Miracles more? Not really sure. The U-Die is .001 smaller then the standard Lee Sizing die. Kinda makes you wonder why the FCD exist at all if you ask me.

#22 Yardbird

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 06:23 PM

It sizes the bullet portion of the loaded case.
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#23 98sr20ve

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 06:38 PM

It sizes the bullet portion of the loaded case.


On a 9mm because it's tapered it really can't touch the bullet portion. On the other cases, it sure can. Especially in 10mm with it's thicker brass.

#24 Yardbird

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 06:42 PM

Sorry, but that's what it does.
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#25 Woody Allen

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Posted 13 April 2010 - 04:30 AM

Flip over a Lee Carbide FCD and a standard Lee Carbide Sizing die. Take a close look. Besides the part in the die that provides the crimp they look exactly the same. Now measure them. Sizing die is .006 smaller then the FCD on average. So if the FCD is a Miracle what is the Lee sizing die? 6 miracles? Or is that .006 Miracles more? Not really sure. The U-Die is .001 smaller then the standard Lee Sizing die. Kinda makes you wonder why the FCD exist at all if you ask me.

It exists so that you can adjust it so the crimp part of the die does not touch the case, and the sizing ring kisses the bottom 2.0 of the case where the Dillon die does not. Allows you to use the Dillon decapping/sizing die, the smoothest operating die out there, and still have all rounds chamber. You do not need the extra sizing done by the U-Die or the standard Lee Carbide Sizing die. The FCD sizes less than both-just what is needed-where it is needed. No twice sizing, no overworking the brass, less wear on your arm, and smoother operation of the press. Indeed, it is a blessing for those loading 9mm range brass for Barsto/KKM Glock barrels.




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